Teddy Adhitya Interview

 

Teddy-1

Photo via Teddy Adhitya

 

Think Before You Type is excited to share our very first bilingual interview. One of our main goals is to have a global impact, and we’re excited to take this step. We recently caught up with Indonesian singer Teddy Adhitya to talk about music, cyberbullying, and the internet.

Think Before You Type (TBYT): How would you describe your music?

Teddy Adhitya: My music is a place where I can tell stories and express feelings. If by genre, it could be said that my music is R&B soul.

Bagaimana cara Kak Teddy mendeskripsikan musik Kak Teddy?

Teddy:  Musik gue adalah tempat gue cerita, mengekspresikan rasa. Kalo secara genre bisa dibilang secara general musik gue adalah R&B Soul.

 

TBYT: If you could play a show anywhere in the world, where would it be? (Jika Kak Teddy dapat konser dimana saja, Kak Teddy ingin konser dimana?)

Teddy: Obviously, Madison Square Garden!

 

TBYT: What is your favorite part about having a career in music?

Teddy: The creative process! In the studio crafting music and lyrics to be heard by a lot of people. And people relate with what I make. When on stage, people enjoy it, and I also enjoy being on stage. It’s the best!

TBYT: Bagian mana yang Kak Teddy sukai dalam berkarir di dunia musik?

Teddy: Proses kreatif! Masuk studio crafting musik dan lirik untuk didenger banyak orang. Dan orang relate sama apa yang gue bikin. Ketika diatas panggung orang ikut menikmati apa yang juga gue nikmati di atas panggung. Itu the best!

 

TBYT: People often forget it, but a little bit of kindness can go a long way. When was the last time a stranger made you smile? 

Teddy: Often. They often smile back.

TBYT: Seringkali orang orang lupa bahwa sedikit kebaikan dapat berdampak sangat banyak. Kapan seseorang yang Kak Teddy tidak kenal memberikan senyum?

Teddy: Sering. Seringnya di senyumin balik sih. Hehe

 

TBYT: If you could speak to someone being cyberbullied, what would you say to encourage them?

Teddy: The freedom of expression on the internet is good if it is positive. Cyberbullying is often done by brave people who are hiding behind their accounts. Don’t take it seriously.

TBYT: Jika Kak Teddy dapat berbicara dengan orang yang terkena cyberbully, apa yang Ingin kak Teddy katakan?

Teddy: Kebebasan berexpresi melalu internet itu bagus, jika positive. Cyberbully dilakukan oleh orang2 yang berani karna mereka bersembunyi dibalik account masing2. Jadi, gausah dipeduliin juga.

 

TBYT: What’s one positive way that you would like to see the internet change?

Teddy: Make it easier access to express oneself. For spreading creations without much cost. A place to explore creation more widely.

TBYT: Apa salah satu perubahan positif yang ingin Kak Teddy lihat di Internet?

Teddy: Makin mudah akses untuk berekspresi. Untuk menyebar luaskan karya tanpa biaya yang besar. Tempat explore kreasi lebih luas.

 

TBYT: How do you deal with negative comments online?

Teddy: I don’t care. Even though sometimes it can be a reference to improve ourselves, but there is no one who knows us better than ourselves. So the negative comments are just like the wind. They surely will pass and don’t impact anything.

TBYT: Bagaimana kak Teddy menghadapi komentar negatif di dunia maya?

Teddy: Ga peduli. Meskipun kadang bisa dijadikan acuan untuk memperbaiki diri. Tapi yang kenal diri kita adalah diri kita sendiri. Jadi komentar negative itu kaya angin aja. Lewat doang. Ga memberi impact apa apa.

 

TBYT: What do you have coming up for the rest of the year?
Teddy: There will be a “NOTHING IS REAL”  showcase at Salihara Theatre on June, 27 2018! So excited!

TBYT: Adakah hal-hal yang akan Kak Teddy bagikan di tahun 2018 ini?

Teddy: Akan ada “NOTHING IS REAL” Showcase di Teater Salihara tanggal 27 Juni 2018! So excited!

Interview with William LeGate

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via @williamlegate Twitter

We had the opportunity to chat with the co-founder of Ponder about what it is like to be a young person in the start-up world.

TBYT: You got into technology at a very young age. What got you so interested, and how did it all start for you?

William: I got an iPhone for my birthday and wanted to make an app for it, not knowing the extensive work & programming knowledge required. Despite it being much harder than I originally thought, I knew that the reward of having something I made being available to the world would be more than worth it. There were lots of hurdles and road bumps, but it was something I was passionate about doing, which is what allowed me to push through the harder times. The most important thing when creating a startup is being passionate about what you’re doing.

TBYT: What advice do you have for young people who want to get into the startup world?

W: If you’re wanting “normal” work hours, a steady salary, or a stress-free lifestyle, the startup world isn’t for you. That being said, if you’re willing to put the work in it that’s required, it’ll prove to be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life.

TBYT: During the crucial time in which you were learning all these things and putting yourself out there, what kept you motivated?

W: Knowing that my work will someday impact lots of people and knowing that once that happens, I can change the world for the better.

TBYT: Have you dealt with any age discrimination? If so, what have you done to get past it?

W: Yes. I was about to close a 6-figure investment at 16… I flew to San Francisco to sign the papers, and when they saw me, the company decided to retract their offer. It was devastating, but after getting over the initial pain, the urge the prove them wrong kept me going.

TBYT: What experience have you or people in your life had with cyberbullying?

W: Too many to list. Cyberbullying sucks. Don’t do it, and if you’re the one being bullied, talk to a parent or some other trusted individual about it. In addition, it’s illegal in many jurisdictions, so if all other means of intervening don’t succeed, consider contacting the authorities. If you let whatever someone says about you, online or otherwise, negatively affect you, you’ve allowed the bully to win. Just know that they are the weak one since they have such little self esteem in themselves that they have to revert to hurting others to make themselves feel better. It gets better.

TBYT: Who is your role model?

W: Elon Musk

TBYT: It’s really fascinating that you didn’t take the traditional path. How can people who don’t have the means to get a traditional college education use the resources that are out there to achieve their goals?

W: There are so many free resources out there available to people who, for whatever reason, don’t want to go down a traditional education path. If you decide to not go to college, I’d ensure that you first ensure that you’re making that decision for the right reasons (i.e. financial issues or a desire to learn in a non-traditional environment… hating homework isn’t an excuse because real world work is even harder). Services like Coursera, Udacity, Khan Academy, and iTunes U are great.

TBYT: What’s the best part about what you do?

W: Waking up every day excited to work and knowing what I do will become a part of people’s daily lives.

TBYT: At TBYT we are all about encouraging people to use the internet for good. What is one positive way that you would like to see the internet change?

W: An increase in crowdsourcing, whether that’s for funding an idea, locating a criminal, or sharing thoughts & opinions.

TBYT: You’re only 20, and you’ve already accomplished a lot. What are your long term goals?

W: It’s hard to tell as I don’t even know where I’ll be a year from now. That’s what’s exciting about the startup world. I’d like to be in a position where I can influence others and help shape a better, brighter future.

Think Before You Type Interviews Roxie Bardo

This photo is owned by Roxie Bardo.

This photo is owned by Roxie Bardo.

We caught up with singer-songwriter Roxie Bardo. We chatted about her music, songwriting process, and taking the time to be kind.

TBYT: You’ve been performing since a really young age. How did you get your start?

Roxie: When I was very young I’d put on shows in my front yard. I would perform songs from Brittney Spears and Mariah Carey for my family. When I reached middle school I began attending a performing arts school that really allowed me to branch out performance wise.

We did musicals mostly but it was a crucial time in my life with regard to setting my career choice in stone.

TBYT: If you could give your younger self one piece of advice, what would it be?

R: I would say that being artistic in any sense is difficult. When you’re young you don’t fully understand what makes you different, but you know that you don’t think the same as your peers. I would tell myself to relax and to not worry so much about what others think. To not be concerned with blending in with the crowds and to embrace my view of the world.

TBYT: Do you have a favorite inspirational quote?

R: Not particularly. At some point in my life someone told me to “Just Be.” It hit home for me. I’m such a perfectionist and those two words get me threw a lot of hardships.

TBYT: What is the one thing that keeps you from getting discouraged on a bad day?

R: I go through quite a few ups and downs in my line of work. Every time I feel hopeless I remember all that I have. All the support I have from my family, all the love I get from my fans, and all the opportunity that’s in front of me. When you find gratitude in your life you’re able to accomplish so much more because all the worry is gone. I have everything I need right now. All my future accomplishes will just be excess.

TBYT: Who are your musical influences?

R: I’m really into Die Antwoord and The Weeknd right now. They are both free, musically speaking. I’m hoping some of their bravery will seep into my subconsciousness!

TBYT: What’s your favorite part of your job?

R: I’m most joyous when I’m performing usually. Although, as of late the creative process has been very exciting. I’m just loving writing right now.

TBYT: How do you deal with negative comments online?

R: Well, as an artist I’m a sponge. I absorb everything around me or being told to me. Because of this I tend to try and stay away from any negativity or cruelty with regard to my music. If I don’t see it or hear about it, I’m good.

TBYT: Do you ever get stage fright?  If so, how do you overcome it?

R: Every time I perform I have a deep nervousness. It comes, for me, before I go on stage. While I’m immersed in the performance I’m fine. I think that’s the key – completely loosing yourself in your music and lyrics. It makes performing an elevated experience that can be quite spiritual.

TBYT: What advice do you have for young people who want to follow their dreams, but might be too afraid to try?

R: I would say that if you love it, do it. There are so many minuscule things that cloud our minds when we are making these life decisions that can drive us crazy. We think too much, all of us. When you let go a bit you end up being the best you. So let go, and if you naturally are steered towards one direction then follow it. Don’t ask questions.

TBYT: You’ve stated that you want your music to have a “deeper meaning” how does this perspective impact your songwriting process?

R: I want my music to evoke emotion. I want it to make you consider ideas and experiences you never have before. So naturally when I’m writing I’m aware of the end goal. I tend to try and surprise or shock myself. If I can make myself question my thoughts and feelings then odds are whoever is listening will feel the same way.

TBYT: Why do you think that it’s important for people to think before they type?

R: Everything you put into the world matters. Every statement, every good or bad feeling, it all can have a domino affect on not only you but those around you. My generation is very careless it seems when it comes to how we treat each other and I pray that we are able to realize that above all else we have to be kind to one another. If you only do one thing in your lifetime let it be being kind to all you come in contact with whether they deserve it or not.

Think Before You Type Media Interviews Minor Soul

Minor Soul

Think Before You Type recently interviewed brothers Jack and Max Wagner, who make up the musical duo, Minor Soul. We discussed their love of performing, how they got their start in music, and how they deal with negative comments online.

Think Before You Type: How did you two get your start in music and performing?

Max: So Jack started playing guitar when he was eight, and he was already writing all these songs really early on. Meanwhile, I was doing a lot of theater acting, performing around Asia in different touring shows. And when I got too old for the theater troupe I was with, I started stealing Jack’s guitar from his room, and he got annoyed at me so he decided to buy me my first guitar for Christmas. I think it was when I was thirteen.

Jack: And so I taught Max how to play some chords, and he taught himself a lot, and we decided to start playing together. And one day Max was on my computer and found all these songs I had written but kept secret because I was too shy.

Max: We put some songs up on YouTube, and we were discovered randomly by Dave Stewart of the Eurythmics, who is just a legendary producer and rock star. And he flew us out to LA and got us started in the industry. We recorded Beneath My Skin with him, and that song and music video led to everything else we have done in our career so far.

TBYT: What’s your favorite social media site?

Jack: Max and I are really into Myspace…

Max: Haha actually our favorite is Instagram. I love taking selfies.

TBYT: You just finished the Infinity Tour with AJR. What is your favorite tour memory?

Jack: The tour was so much fun, and it was a massive learning experience because it was our first ever tour. My favorite moment was in Rochester when we played our song, “Charlie Chaplin”, and the whole crowd started singing along to the anthem in the bridge of the song. That was the first time there was such a massive crowd sing-a-long to our music.

Max: I just really enjoyed being on the road with the AJR boys and also playing the encore with them — the fans really loved seeing all of us on stage together.

TBYT:  Who are your role models?

Jack: I think my role model in terms of music is John Lennon or Paul McCartney, they are the top of the pile.

Max: My role model is Gordon Ramsay.

TBYT:  What is your writing process like?

Max: It kind of depends on the song actually. Some songs Jack starts by himself, some songs I start by myself, and there are some we write completely together from start to finish.

Jack: For example, “Beneath My Skin” was a song I had written by myself, and I presented it to Max and he actually changed the end of the song and wrote the whole “Oh Oh Oh” outro part, which is the best part of the song!

TBYT: In what ways has the internet impacted your work with Minor Soul?

Max: We are really focused on building our fanbase through social media, so the internet is really important to us. We love connecting with fans around the world so easily, and we try to be really responsive and active with them.

TBYT: When you’re down, what song helps to pick up your mood?

Jack: I usually cheer myself up with some Bee Gees. “You Win Again” is my favorite.

Max: Anything by Tiesto gets me in a good mood.

TBYT: You guys were born in London, but you grew up in Hong Kong, and now you live in New York. How has living in such diverse places influenced you two as people and as musicians?

Max: We were so lucky to grow up in Hong Kong, and it has definitely made Jack and I discover a lot of wonderful things around the world. We are in love with traveling and we still try to go back home to Hong Kong once a year if we can.

Jack: And I guess as musicians we were mostly influenced by our dad, who is a massive Beatles and David Bowie fan. So for our music, it was less to do with where we grew up and more to do with the people who raised us.

TBYT:  Sometimes the internet can be a really tough place. How do you deal with negative comments on social media?

Max: We honestly don’t get too many negative comments right now which is very lucky given how harsh people on the internet can be. But when we do get something negative we just look to all the positives and remind ourselves that getting affected by the odd negative comment is not worth it at all.

Jack: We believe in what we are doing, and we also have been through so many tough experiences in the music industry that we don’t get affected by the little negative things anymore. We just focus on ourselves, and we are just so happy to be able to make music as our job!

TBYT: What do you guys have coming up for the rest of the year, and early 2015?
 
Max: Well this tour was awesome and also a lot of work, so after just getting off that we are gonna focus on promoting our music through social media and we are definitely gonna just keep working hard. If we can get on another tour as the opener that would be incredible!

AJR Interview

I headed over to Silver Spring, MD to interview the brothers in AJR at the first night of their Infinity Tour. We discussed cyberbullying, positive internet use, their exciting career, and having the courage to stand out. Check the interview out and let us know what you think!

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Thanks for watching 🙂

May Dare 1!

We’re very sorry that this is out first post in a while. Things got super busy with school, but we’re back! Check out our new Dare and join us in saying some encouraging things to the important women in our lives.

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http://tbytinc.org/

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