Kolby Koloff Interview


When we came upon, Kolby Koloff’s single, “Save Yourself”, we knew it was a song that would be perfect for TBYT’s Music Mondays. We also knew that we wanted to interview the woman behind the music and learn more about who she is as an individual and as an artist. Kolby had so many encouraging and inspiring words to share with us! We hope you enjoy reading what she had to say!

Think Before You Type: What prompted you to start making music? Did you always know you wanted to sing?

Kolby Koloff:  I never thought I would be doing music as a career. I have always sang, but I never sang for other people because I was too afraid. Towards the end of 2013, my brother in law (who has been in the industry for years) started to invite me to come and song write with him. I was very reluctant, but I started to go. I fell in love with it. The entire process of creating music fascinated me and I knew that I had to keep doing it.

TBYT: How does your faith affect your online presence?

Kolby: I want to make sure that whatever I post, say, or comment is always respectful. Not only respectful of myself but respectful of my followers. Christ was so perfect at speaking truth but doing it in such a loving way. I always want to represent Him in everything I do. If people stumble on my profile, I want them to see things that are life giving and encouraging so I try to take that into consideration every time I post something.

TBYT: If you had the chance to speak to someone who has been cyberbullied, what would you say to encourage them?

Kolby: First off, I’ve been there. I was cyberbullied badly all throughout high school. It’s not easy, and it really can make you feel like you’re doing something wrong. Let me tell you, it’s not you. Hurt people hurt people. Don’t buy into the lies that people post. The fact is, they are reacting from a place of pain and what they’re saying about you is actually a reflection of how they feel about themselves. If it’s really bad, tell someone. There’s NOTHING weak about sharing with someone things that are hurting you.

TBYT: We’re big fans of your new single, “Save Yourself”. Where did the inspiration for the song come from?

Kolby: Save Yourself is one of the most vulnerable pieces of music I’ve released so far. For years I struggled with depression. In the midst of that depression, I was bullied, had friends turn their back on me, and experienced a lot of other life changes. I felt hopeless. However, nobody around me knew I was going through all of this, because I hid it. I thought it was better to just appear like I had everything together. Eventually all of that caught up with me and I had to realize that I couldn’t save myself. I needed to let other people, especially God, come in and help my heart get better. The waves of life were drowning me and if I didn’t receive help then I wasn’t going to make it.

TBYT: What has the transition from being on the TV show “Preachers’ Daughters” to working in music been like?

Kolby: Transition from television to music has not been that difficult. They are both hard
businesses to get into, and even harder to stay in. The payoff has always been worth it for me though, because I am doing what I love and spreading Christ’s message through it.

TBYT: In today’s day and age, many young girls are struggling with body image issues. What advice do you have for young girls who are dealing with these kinds of things?

Kolby: Again, I have been here. For a world who talks about “accepting people the way they are” so much, there are way too many unrealistic standards that are being set for us women. If you are feeling those pressures, and have started to believe that you’re only beautiful if you look a certain way, shape, or size, that’s a bunch of baloney. There is NOTHING that could make you not good enough. The God of the universe, who designed Mt. Everest, Hawaii, sunsets, and the galaxy, also designed you. Everything He touches is beautiful and worthy. You are worthy and beautiful just the way you are. Fight the “status quo”! When someone says you should do this or do that to improve yourself, tell them thanks for the advice but you’re perfect the way you were created. When I was struggling with body image, I would put post-it notes on my mirror that had Bible verses on them about beauty. Every time I looked in the mirror and began thinking negative things about myself, I read them and was reminded that I am a daughter of The King and nothing He touches is ugly.

TBYT: If you could tour with any artist living or alive, who would you choose and why?

Kolby: I think I would chose to tour with Ben Rector or Drew Holcomb. They both are artists who embody music that has meaning but still makes you want to dance around a room.

TBYT: What kind of impact have you seen “Save Yourself” have on your listeners?

Kolby: I’ve been really blessed at the reaction to Save Yourself. People have shared their
stories with me, how the song is helping them beat their depression, helping their hearts while going through breakups, family struggles, etc. It has been the biggest blessing because I wrote this when I needed a song to help me get through the same things.

TBYT: Who are your musical influences?

Kolby: My musical influences are Nora Jones, Regina Spektor, and Ingrid Michelson.

TBYT: What plans do you have for 2018?

Kolby: My plan for 2018 is to continue to release music, tour, and keep writing more songs!

Joshua Luke Smith Interview


We recently caught up with rapper, poet, and producer Joshua Luke Smith to talk about about music, confidence, and positivity online.

Think Before You Type: Why did you start making music?

Joshua Luke Smith: I started writing music out of the curiosity of what could happen. It was that simple. It was as if I stumbled across a laboratory full of potions when I first picked up the guitar and started strumming chords. The liberation and trepidation of being able to create…. anything. From there it became solace, a place to explore my thoughts and craft words that would speak to the chaos around me.

TBYT: How would you describe the style of your music?

Joshua: I would say it’s what would happen if Cat Stevens (Yusuf Islam) could rap (ha!). It’s story telling, folk music that feels at home in His Hop.

TBYT: You have a very positive presence online. Why is that important to you?

Joshua: I write to Speak Into the Chaos. To speak words of life and hope in the midst of some darks days. Whether it’s a tweet, a song or speaking to a room full of people, it’s a soapbox I can stand on, and I don’t take that for granted!

TBYT: If you could speak to someone who is being cyberbullied, what would you say to encourage them?

Joshua: I would say you are not the words that have been spoken over you, nor are you defined by the pain others have chosen to hurl at you. You’re meant to be here. You matter and you have a future worth waking up for. I would say I’m sorry. Not because I’m involved but because it breaks my heart every time someone is subjected to the hurt that another has not found healing for. I would say you are not alone, though I know it feels like it. I would say Hope is Real and Help is Real.

TBYT: What is one positive way that you would like to see the internet change?

Joshua: I’d love to see nothing written and about anyone, anywhere by another person who wouldn’t say the same words if they were together standing in the same room. It’s harder to hurt another person when you can see you shared humanity.

TBYT: It takes a lot of confidence to get up on stage and perform in front of people. What advice would you give to someone who needs the confidence to get up in front of even a small crowd?

Joshua: Don’t run away from your nerves. To be nervous is to recognise you’re about to do something drenched in purpose. If it doesn’t cost you, it’s not worth as much. Embrace that feeling, own it, and hold onto the truth that your voice, your story, your song matters. Ask for feedback. Be humble. Take people on the journey with you.

TBYT: If you could play a show anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Joshua: I think it would be NYC. The home and birth place of Hip Hop.

TBYT: What is the biggest thing that you want people to take away from your music?

Joshua: That what it means to be human is far more sacred and special thing than they realised.

TBYT: What do you have coming up in 2018?

Joshua: ALOT. New music, touring Europe and the U.S. More poetry. More opportunity to live with less fear. The chance of being a better man, a more caring husband and a more faithful friend.

Interview with Body Banter Founder Steph Ng

image1We recently caught up with Steph Ng, the founder of Body Banter, to talk about body image, positivity online, and how others can get involved with her online platform.

Think Before You Type: What is Body Banter?

Steph: Body Banter is an online platform that aims to open up the discussion about body image issues through sharing ideas and opinions using varied and creative formats (e.g. videos, written pieces, spoken word, artwork, photographs). By encouraging more people to speak up about their experiences and ideas, Body Banter aims to bring to more widespread attention the problematic way we judge and evaluate bodies and to highlight the diversity inherent in both the people that experience body image issues as well as in the ways that these issues are experienced.

TBYT: What prompted you to start your organization? 

Steph: I suffered from anorexia nervosa in my early teens, and therefore understand firsthand how poor body image can affect both mental and physical wellbeing. I didn’t realize that I had an eating disorder until I became quite physically ill, and it was extremely hard for my family to find help for me during my recovery process, largely because we (including me) didn’t have any idea what an eating disorder, let alone anorexia, was! I realized that this had a lot to do with the fact that in Chinese culture, mental health problems are rarely talked about, as they are considered quite taboo and shameful. This avoidance is extremely problematic, as media portrayals of unrealistic body shapes and the number of individuals who develop body image issues and eating disorders are only on the rise in this day and age! Many people don’t realize that their mental state is a problem until physical symptoms arise, which can often be debilitating and even life-threatening. In short, I started Body Banter because I want people to be able to learn about self and body love before the media teaches them to hate and punish. I want to show people that as isolating as the experience of negative body image can be, that these experiences are diverse and happen to others of such diverse backgrounds, and that we can heal together, as a global community. There is too much negative online media, and I want Body Banter to be part of the growing movement towards a more positive online environment.

TBYT: When was the last time that a stranger made you smile? 

Steph: To be honest, a stranger makes me smile everyday! I really like to make friends in unexpected places, and if I can find something in common with someone random on the street (like the same taste in funky colourful leggings!), I often can’t help but strike up a conversation and see where it leads! Obviously, I rarely end up staying in contact with someone whose leggings I complimented, but I do end up walking away with a big smile and a big dose of positive vibes! 🙂

TBYT: What would you say to someone who has been cyberbullied?

Steph: First of all, I would say to NEVER suppress your feelings of hurt, or to tell yourself that those feelings are not “valid.” Find someone you trust and confide in them – expressing hurt is an integral part of the healing process. Secondly, I would tell them not to delay seeking help. I consider it one of the bravest behaviours to assert power over situations that often feel out of your control. Moreover, it is often the case that seeking help allows you to understand just how many people are also experiencing the same thing, and how much support is available to you.

TBYT: How can we spread positivity online? 

Steph: A great way to start is just to be more conscious of the way we use our words. You can never tell how personally affected someone might feel when you comment on their photo or their post. If you have nothing nice to say, then don’t say it! Another tip is to never engage in heated arguments online. It is often difficult to tell what the person is really thinking or feeling in the moment, even if you know that person personally, and is the perfect place for misunderstandings to occur.

TBYT: What has been your favorite experience with Body Banter?

Steph: My favorite experience with Body Banter thus far is when someone Facebook messaged me to say that having once struggled with body image issues as a result of media influences, they found Body Banter to be a very positive and empowering online presence. It totally made me tear up! 🙂 I always say that Body Banter doesn’t need to change the world (though it would be pretty cool if it did!) – it just needs to make positive impact on someone’s life, or at least challenge someone to reconsider problematic stereotypes/assumptions that they have previously taken for granted.

TBYT: What are your goals for Body Banter in 2018? 

Steph: With regards to the Body Banter website, I would definitely like to see more people contribute video or written pieces, and share more perspectives on their experiences with body image. I also just started a Body Banter club at Duke, and my main goal is for the discussion about body image to expand within the Duke community! One big goal is to create a discussion based workshop that can be delivered by students, to students, with the aim being to spread ideas about body positivity while also seeking to understand more perspectives about body image.

TBYT: How can people get involved with Body Banter? 

Steph: Body Banter’s mission is for the sharing experience to be a conversation, so optimally people would not only share their own ideas, but also respond to ideas that interest (or even annoy!) them in their daily lives. I also want to add that the more original and creative the format of sharing is, the better! For example, we have received art pieces, and even a stop-motion video!

Whitney Woerz Interview

Whitney Woerz

We recently had the opportunity to chat with singer-songwriter Whitney Woerz about her anti-bullying efforts, mental health advocacy, and her music.

Think Before You Type: What inspired you to start singing?
Whitney Woerz: I’ve been singing since before I was talking, my mom likes to say. I grew up doing musical theater, and ever since a very young age, I knew music was what I wanted to do with my life.

TBYT: How did you get into songwriting, and what is your songwriting process?Whitney: I wrote my first song for a friend who I only knew over social media. She told me that she wanted to kill herself. I wanted to help her, but I couldn’t physically see her. So I sat down and wrote her a song called Ghost Story.

TBYT: Who are your musical influences?
Whitney: A big musical influence for my is Lorde. Her lyrics/music are so intricate and unique, and I just love her sound. Another artist I am inspired by (lyrically) is Twenty One Pilots. Their lyrics are so inspirational and hold a message about mental health which I love.

TBYT: What was the inspiration for the video for Ghost Story? What was the process of making it like? What was it like to see the finished product?
Whitney: I worked with director Liz Garbus to put together a documentary/music video centering around six kids who are struggling with mental illness to share their story. The objective was to let people watching know that they aren’t alone in anything they are going through and to show that it’s ok to talk about these things. The process was really fun and inspiring. I am really close now with the people in it. Seeing the finished product for the first time made me cry. I was so so happy I would be able to share this message and so happy for the other kids that they would be able to help people 🙂

TBYT: Since releasing Ghost Story and coming out with a pro-mental health/anti-bullying message, what type of response have you seen?
Whitney: Some responses I get triggered by the music video are “this saved my life” or “this inspired me to keep going.” Comments like these make me want to continue doing what I do and keep making music to help people.

TBYT: How have you been able to use the internet in a positive way?
Whitney: I respond to almost 100% of comments on each of my social media platforms. By doing this, I form relationships with fans and can help them through anything they might be going through. I also always try to spread a positive message through anything I post.

TBYT: How do you deal with negativity online?
Whitney: I try to ignore hate comments. I tell myself they are jealous, and I focus on the positive.

TBYT: If you could speak to someone who is being cyberbullied, what would you say to encourage them?
Whitney: I always let them know that they aren’t alone. I also tell them (if it’s cyberbullying) that whoever is doing it is clearly not confident and would never say those things in person. The people who try to take others down over the internet are usually sad and have nothing better to do than to bully, which is uncool and shouldn’t be taken.

TBYT: Can you tell us about your work with Bring Change 2 Mind?
Whitney: I am a teen ambassador for Bring Change 2 mind, which is an organization run by Glenn Close to help end the stigma around mental illness. I got involved with them before I wrote Ghost Story, and they helped me through what to do with my friend who wanted to kill herself. They told me to call the suicide hotline for her, and after that, I wanted to be a part of their mission to save lives and end the stigma.

TBYT: Do you have anything exciting coming up in 2018?
Whitney: Yes! I am planning to release new music around February and also planning on touring over the summer.